‘Photo editor sdk’ Client-side image processing with unmatched performance.

 

The HTML5 Photo Editor

Our HTML5 editor is a simple beauty, with powerful editing features and a super fast rendering engine under the hood.

  • Customizable through API and CSS
  • Full mobile support
  • WebGL rendering engine

 

iOS Photo Editor

The industry-first photo editor build with Swift, featuring lightening fast photo processing functions.

  • Compatible with Swift and Objective-C builds
  • Create your own filters with Photoshop
  • Tilt-Shift, high quality filters

 

Android Photo Editor

Easy to integrate and highly customizable. Our SDK for Android sets a new standard in photo editing on the Android platform.

  • Handcrafted filters with live preview
  • Support for nearly 95% of all Android devices
  • High resolution images, low memory footprint

 

Integration of the SDK was really simple and added instant value to our service. And our customers love the sleek editor!

 

https://www.photoeditorsdk.com/

 

 

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Saying 👋 to Allo and Duo: new apps for smart messaging and video calling

 

Whether it’s welcoming a new baby, celebrating the winning shot in overtime, or discovering the best taco stand ever—we all want to share these moments with friends and family the instant they happen. Most of the time, this means picking up our phones and sending a message or starting a call. Today we’re sharing a preview of two new apps that take a fresh look at how people connect.

Allo, a smart messaging app
Allo is a smart messaging app that makes your conversations easier and more expressive. It’s based on your phone number, so you can get in touch with anyone in your phonebook. And with deeply integrated machine learning, Allo has smart features to keep your conversations flowing and help you get things done.

Emojis, stickers, Ink, and our Whisper Shout feature in Allo

Allo has Smart Reply built in (similar to Inbox), so you can respond to messages without typing a single word. Smart Reply learns over time and will show suggestions that are in your style. For example, it will learn whether you’re more of a “haha” vs. “lol” kind of person. The more you use Allo the more “you” the suggestions will become. Smart Reply also works with photos, providing intelligent suggestions related to the content of the photo. If your friend sends you a photo of tacos, for example, you may see Smart Reply suggestions like “yummy” or “I love tacos.”

Smart Reply suggestions in Allo

Allo also features the Google assistant, bringing the richness of Google directly into your chats—helping you find information, get things done, and have fun. You can chat one-on-one with the assistant, or call on Google in a group chat with friends. Either way, you no longer have to jump between apps to do things like book a dinner reservation with friends, get up-to-date sports scores, settle a bet, or play a game. The assistant in Allo lets you bring things like Search, Maps, YouTube and Translate to all your conversations, so that you and your friends can use Google together.

The Google assistant in Allo understands your world, so you can ask for things like your agenda for the day, details of your flight and hotel, or photos from your last trip. And since it understands natural language patterns, you can just chat like yourself and it’ll understand what you’re saying. For example, “Is my flight delayed?” will return information about your flight status.

Google assistant in Allo

Privacy and security are important in messaging, so following in the footsteps of Chrome, we created Incognito mode in Allo. Chats in Incognito mode will have end-to-end encryption and discreet notifications, and we’ll continue to add new features to this mode.

Duo, a video calling app for everyone
Duo is a simple, fast one-to-one video calling app for everyone—whether you’re on Android or iOS, a fast or slow connection, in New York or New Delhi. Like Allo, Duo is based on your phone number, allowing you to reach anyone in your phonebook. And its simple interface fades away when you’re in a call, so it’s just the two of you.

Video call in Duo

One of our favorite features of Duo is Knock Knock, which shows you a live video preview of the caller before you pick up. Knock Knock invites you into the moment, making calls feel spontaneous and fun. Once you answer, Duo seamlessly transitions you right into the call.

Duo calls are in crisp HD video (up to 720p) and audio. We’ve optimized Duo to work well even on spotty networks, so if bandwidth is limited it gracefully adjusts quality so you’re still able to connect. We also seamlessly transition calls between cellular and Wi-Fi, so you don’t need to worry about what network you’re on. Finally, we built Duo with privacy and security in mind and all calls on Duo are end-to-end encrypted.


Both Allo and Duo will be available this summer on Android and iOS. We can’t wait for you to try them.

What’s new in Android: the N-Release, Virtual Reality, Android Studio 2.2 . . .

 

In the past year, Android users around the globe have installed apps–built by developers like you–over 65 billion times on Google Play. To help developers continue to build amazing experiences on top of Android, today at Google I/O, we announced a number of new things we’re doing with the platform, including the next Developer Preview of Android N, an extension of Android into virtual reality, an update to Android Studio, and much more!

Android N Developer Preview is available to try on a range of devices

Android N: Performance, Productivity and Security
With Android N, we want to achieve a new level of product excellence for Android, so we’ve carried out some pretty deep surgery to the platform, rewriting and redesigning some fundamental aspects of how the system works. For Android N, we are focused on three key themes: performance, productivity and security. The first Developer Preview introduced a brand new JIT compiler to improve software performance, make app installs faster, and take up less storage. The second N Developer Preview included Vulkan, a new 3D rendering API to help game developers deliver high performance graphics on mobile devices. Both previews also brought useful productivity improvements to Android, including Multi-Window support and Direct Reply.

Multi-Window mode on Android N

Android N also adds some important new features to help keep users safer and more secure. Inspired by how Chromebooks apply updates, we’re introducing seamless updates, so that new Android devices built on N can install system updates in the background. This means that the next time a user powers up their device, new devices can automatically and seamlessly switch into the new updated system image.

Today’s release of Android N Developer Preview 3 is our first beta-quality candidate, available to test on your primary phone or tablet. You can opt in to the Android Beta Program at android.com/beta and run Android N on your Nexus 6, 9, 5X, 6P, Nexus Player, Pixel C, and Android One (General Mobile 4G). By inviting more people to try this beta release, developers can expect to see an uptick in usage of your apps on N; if you’ve got an Android app, you should be testing how it works on N, and be watching for feedback from users.

VR Mode in Android  
Android was built for today’s multi-screen world; in fact, Android powers your phone, your tablet, the watch on your wrist, it even works in your car and in your living room, all the while helping you move seamlessly between each device. As we look to what’s next, we believe your phone can be a really powerful new way to see the world and experience new content virtually, in a more immersive way; but, until this point, high quality mobile VR wasn’t possible across the Android ecosystem. That’s why we’ve worked at all levels of the Android stack in N–from how the operating system reads sensor data to how it sends pixels to the display–to make it especially built to provide high quality mobile VR experiences, with VR Mode in Android. There are a number of performance enhancements designed for developers, including single buffer rendering and access to an exclusive CPU core for VR apps. Within your apps, you can take advantage of smooth head-tracking and stereo notifications that work for VR. Most importantly, Android N provides for very low latency graphics; in fact, motion-to-photon latency on Nexus 6P running Developer Preview 3 is <20 ms, the speed necessary to establish immersion for the user to feel like they are actually in another place. We’ll be covering all of the new VR updates tomorrow at 9AM PT in the VR at Google session, livestreamed from Google I/O.

Android Instant Apps: real apps, without the installation 
We want to make it easier for users to discover and use your apps. So what if your app was just a tap away? What if users didn’t have to install it at all? Today, we’re introducing Android Instant Apps as part of our effort to evolve the way we think about apps. Whether someone discovers your app from search, social media, messaging or other deep links, they’ll be able to experience a fast and powerful native Android app without needing to stop and install your app first or reauthenticate. Best of all, Android Instant Apps is compatible with all Android devices running Jellybean or higher (4.1+) with Google Play services. Android Instant Apps functionality is an upgrade to your existing Android app, not a new, separate app; you can sign-up to request early access to the documentation.

Android Wear 2.0: UI changes and standalone apps  
This morning at Google I/O, we also announced the most significant Android Wear update since its launch two years ago: Android Wear 2.0. Based on what we’ve learned from users and developers, we’re evolving the platform to improve key watch experiences: watch faces, messaging, and fitness. We’re also making a number of UI changes and updating our design guidelines to make your apps more consistent, intuitive, and beautiful.  With Android Wear 2.0, apps can be standalone and have direct network access to the cloud via a Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, or cellular connection.  Since your app won’t have to rely on theData Layer APIs, it can continue to offer full functionality even if the paired phone is far away or turned off. You can read about all of the new features available in today’s preview here.

Android Studio 2.2 Preview: a new layout designer, constraint layout, and much more
Android Studio is the quickest way to get up and running with Android N and all our new platform features. Today at Google I/O, we previewed Android Studio 2.2 – another big update to the IDE designed to help you code faster with smart new tooling features built in. One of the headline features is our rewritten layout designer with the new constraint layout. In addition to helping you get out of XML to do your layouts visually, the new tools help you easily design for Android’s many great devices. Once you’re happy with a layout, we do all the hard work to automatically calculate constraints for you, so your UIs will resize automatically on different screen sizes . Here’s an overview of more of what’s new in 2.2 Preview (we’ll be diving into more detail this update at 10AM PT tomorrow in “What’s new in Android Development Tools”, livestreamed from Google I/O):

  • Speed: New layout designer and constraint layout, Espresso test recording and even faster builds
  • Smarts: APK analyzer, Layout inspector, expanded Android code analysis and IntelliJ 2016.1
  • Platform Support: Enhanced Jack compiler / Java 8 support, Expanded C++ support with CMake and NDK-Build, Firebase support and enhanced accessibility

 

New Layout Editor and Constraint Layout in Android Studio 2.2 Preview

This is just a small taste of some of the new updates for Android, announced today at Google I/O. There are more than 50 Android-related sessions over the next three days; if you’re not able to join us in person, many of them will be livestreamed, and all of them will be posted to YouTube after we’re done. We can’t wait to see what you build!

Optimize, Develop, and Debug with Vulkan Developer Tools

Optimization: The Vulkan API

There are many similarities between OpenGL ES and Vulkan, but Vulkan offers new features for developers who need to make every millisecond count.

  • Application control of memory allocation. Vulkan provides mechanisms for fine-grained control of how and when memory is allocated on the GPU. This allows developers to use their own allocation and recycling policies to fit their application, ultimately reducing execution and memory overhead and allowing applications to control when expensive allocations occur.
  • Asynchronous command generation. In OpenGL ES, draw calls are issued to the GPU as soon as the application calls them. In Vulkan, the application instead submits draw calls to command buffers, which allows the work of forming and recording the draw call to be separated from the act of issuing it to the GPU. By spreading command generation across several threads, applications can more effectively make use of multiple CPU cores. These command buffers can also be reused, reducing the overhead involved in command creation and issuance.
  • No hidden work. One OpenGL ES pitfall is that some commands may trigger work at points which are not explicitly spelled out in the API specification or made obvious to the developer. Vulkan makes performance more predictable and consistent by specifying which commands will explicitly trigger work and which will not.
  • Multithreaded design, from the ground up. All OpenGL ES applications must issue commands for a context only from a single thread in order to render predictably and correctly. By contrast, Vulkan doesn’t have this requirement, allowing applications to do work like command buffer generation in parallel— but at the same time, it doesn’t make implicit guarantees about the safety of modifying and reading data from multiple threads at the same time. The power and responsibility of managing thread synchronization is in the hands of the application.
  • Mobile-friendly features. Vulkan includes features particularly helpful for achieving high performance on tiling GPUs, used by many mobile devices. Applications can provide information about the interaction between separate rendering passes, allowing tiling GPUs to make effective use of limited memory bandwidth, and avoid performing off-chip reads.
  • Offline shader compilation. Vulkan mandates support for SPIR-V, an intermediate language for shaders. This allows developers to compile shaders ahead of time, and ship SPIR-V binaries with their applications. These binaries are simpler to parse than high-level languages like GLSL, which means less variance in how drivers perform this parsing. SPIR-V also opens the door for third parties to provide compilers for specialized or cross-platform shading languages.
  • Optional validation. OpenGL ES validates every command you call, checking that arguments are within expected ranges, and objects are in the correct state to be operated upon. Vulkan doesn’t perform any of this validation itself. Instead, developers can use optional debug tools to ensure their calls are correct, incurring no run-time overhead in the final product.

 

Debugging: Validation Layers

As noted above, Vulkan’s lack of implicit validation requires developers to make use of tools outside the API in order to validate their code. Vulkan’s layer mechanism allows validation code and other developer tools to inspect every API call during development, without incurring any overhead in the shipping version. Our guides show you how to build the validation layers for use with the Android NDK, giving you the tools necessary to build bug-free Vulkan code from start to finish.

 

Develop: Shader toolchain

The Shaderc collection of tools provides developers with build-time and run-time tools for compiling GLSL into SPIR-V. Shaders can be compiled at build time using glslc, a command-line compiler, for easy integration into existing build systems. Or, for shaders which are generated or edited during execution, developers can use the Shaderc library to compile GLSL shaders to SPIR-V via a C interface. Both tools are built on top of Khronos’s reference compiler.

 

” QuickChat ” A single window based chat app

 

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QuickChat is completely free chat application. It’s a single window based chat app.
The user can change the color ( theme ) of the app.

The username / phone number will be shown in green color if that user in online.

You can switch the text keyboard and emoji’s.

Speech to text converter for easy and fast chat.

Get notifications when new messages arrives.

Long press on the letter can be clear the chat.

You can invite the people to chat.
This is under testing now.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=a.sample.quickchat

 

QuickChat